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Got Swag?

Got Swag?

Think about the last time you attended a seminar, workshop, or tradeshow. You got swag.

All the stuff you brought back, where is it? What did you do with those little gifts, binders, notes, notebooks, and product samples from a continuing education event or tradeshow?

You may come from the event and “put the bounty bag down for later”. But if you did not have a concrete, immediate plan for it, “later” never came, and eventually, you got tired of stepping over that bag or moving it from one place to the other.

You decided to place it where it would not interfere with your daily life (i.e., where you could not see it anymore).

Swag Turns into Clutter

Once you can’t see that material anymore, it is out of your mind. It does not interfere with your daily life, that’s true. But that means that you forget about it. Hence, a new bag to clutter your space!

If all that stuff is out of your mind, it is unimportant to you, and you don’t need it.

But why did you gather that stuff in the first place? It could be an automatic reaction to grab anything free.

Benefit From It

Think of ways that material can benefit your present life, help you in your career, relationships, or whatever it might be. Then, decide on concrete, appropriate steps to allow that to happen.

This process takes intention and planning. It will not happen if you relegate that bag or binder full of notes and product samples to a place you won’t think about.

What To Do with It

Here are some examples of what that process of paying attention to that material might look like:

  • You took notes on the various seminars during the activity — to cement the knowledge in your brain, transcribe the notes by hand. Then, scan those notes and file the document in an electronic file related to the topic. If you have Evernote or the like, that’s another convenient way to keep your information handy and classified.
  • You received printed material you already know is valuable and want to keep — scan it and follow the steps described above. If you’re going to keep the paper copies, make a file.
  • You collected sample items — Are you interested in trying those items? Place them where you are most likely to use them and try them! Did you collect the items for someone else? Place the things where you won’t forget to take them the next time you see that person.
  • Were there recommendations about books, apps, or programs to try? — If you made notes on these, these interested you in the first place. Revisit each of those and decide what needs to happen for you to act on it if that still sounds like a good idea.
  • Do you have ideas to develop? — Don’t let it go to waste! Instead, assign a time on your calendar to make those things happen or list the steps needed to obtain that goal. Then, calendar those steps. What gets in the calendar gets done.
  • Business cards — Scan them or input the information with appropriate notes into your iPhone. Then, establish steps and dates to reach those contacts, explore possibilities together, and network.

Take Action

You can certainly come up with more ways to benefit from all the material gathered at that event. The point is to take action about those ideas!

You paid money to attend these events, and you invested your time. Don’t let that go to waste. Learn how to get the most out of these mysterious swag bags we love to collect, for they hold a wealth of possibilities!

Make This Time Count

Make This Time Count

Social distancing times have brought trends to stay—for example, people working from home. Many companies have realized they are more productive when employees are at home. 

People have found they like the convenience and flexibility this allows. Therefore, more and more people are adopting this trend as the new normal.  

Some schools have kept remote learning as a permanent alternative for the students. 

As a result, we still share our home space (and for more extended periods) with other household members. 

Clutter and lack of systems hit us harder when we are closer under one roof. Thriving under these conditions requires adjustments for most of us. But change can be very positive, depending on how we take it.

I, for one, discovered a new joy in being around my husband and children. We have created a productive and harmonious (very goofy) work environment. And I don’t need to mention how ecstatic our dog is with this at-home arrangement.

But living, working, studying, and playing closer to each other for extended periods may cause previously considered menial details about our space to appear more significant and bother us. 

Here are some things that might help us enjoy our new way of co-existing to make the best of the situation.

Keep It Clutter-Free And Clean

  • Have a trash can in every room and take out the trash daily. 
  • Have antibacterial soap or sanitizer on every sink.
  • Handle your incoming mail daily, rapidly, and efficiently. The last thing you need is more paper clutter around your home.
  • Take 15 minutes at the beginning of each day to put the house in order: Clean the counters, vacuum floors/carpets, and open up shades or curtains to let the sunlight in.
  • Gather dirty dishes and utensils inside the dishwasher throughout the day so the counters remain clear. It requires putting away clean containers every night before bedtime or first thing in the morning, so the day starts with an empty dishwasher.
  • Get caught up with your laundry as soon as possible. Laundry is often the nemesis of many households. You don’t need the added clutter right now. Read my laundry process blog if this needs to be improved.

Embrace A Positive Attitude

  • Make beds daily – this gives you a sense of accomplishment to start your day.
  • Get dressed as if you were going to work or school – when you dress up, this shows in your demeanor on the phone and Zoom calls.

Enjoy Family Time

  • Go on walks outside with the family – if we are together at home, we can take advantage of that.
  • Watch a movie or play board games as a family – welcome back game and movie nights.
  • Get to know each other better!

Stay Healthy

  • Develop a system to ensure everyone takes their supplements and medications consistently.
  • Grocery shopping needs strategic planning to have what we need while avoiding waste. Although we eat more meals at home, buying more than we need leads to food waste. Have a well-planned system.
  • Go to bed and wake up at the usual time every day. Also, keep meal schedules. These two practices allow the body to maintain a routine and feel better.

Increase Productivity

  • Assign spaces for each household member to work or study. These spaces can vary by day, but it is easy to control clutter and have an increased focus if everyone has a space to operate each day. 
  • Avoid distractions by ensuring your pets are cared for before starting your business or school day. Ensure your pets have adequate food and water, have gone outside (if applicable), and have safe and comfy areas to rest.
  • Try listening to Binaural Beats using headphones while you work or study to boost productivity. Binaural Beats in the Beta pattern promote concentration and alertness. Listening to Beta waves helps to increase focus, productivity, critical thinking, decision-making, situational awareness, and memory. Beta waves also help increase energy, sharpen your hearing, and improve overall well-being. 
  •  To take productivity to the next level, combine the binaural beats experience with the diffusion of essential oils that enhance mood and increase brain activity. Young Living Essential Oils are the purest oils you can find. Some oils that improve brain function and affect mood are Vitality, Joy, Awaken, Motivation, Frankincense, Peppermint, Sandalwood, and Lavender.

New trends and practices show us that we can move forward in more productive and efficient ways than we ever thought. 

My Desk Looks Great! (All Papers Are on The Kitchen Counter)

My Desk Looks Great! (All Papers Are on The Kitchen Counter)

Organizing Paper

So you say: “My desk looks great,” but all the papers are on the kitchen counter? Aren’t we proud? (LOL)

If this is you, please know you are not alone and that paper clutters homes the most because it is harder to corral, classify, and organize.

Paper is sneaky, and you can’t see the chaos it makes by looking at a page here and there. But when it accumulates enough for you to notice, then it is too late.

Whether it is brochures, magazines, newspapers, instruction manuals, receipts, unopened mail, coupons, gift cards, or schoolwork, these things hang around the house and clutter everyone’s lives.

When organizing clients’ homes, they are often surprised by an unpleasant by-product: the unforeseen accumulation of paper and other items that don’t have a definite place in the house.

We gather all paper, including magazines, brochures, children’s papers, and projects. These should be addressed later by the client. We can’t save our clients from doing this work.

Because looking at the paper collected, it is impossible to know what you need to keep; you’ll have to do the work you have been avoiding in the first place (except that now it is all accumulated and is a lot!)

Since this part of the process is a necessary evil, and people fear paper so much, leaving you in the dark to do your homework is unfair. So, here is a detailed guide to winning the paper clutter battle.

NOTE: Before we start, you need to establish a cut-off date, after which you will manage your incoming mail and papers using your new system (thus, staying on top of that).

1. Clean up your files

You will need space for the new stuff that requires filing. If you do not have a filing system, this is the time to create one. Your filing system should preferably be in your home office. The best options would be a rolling cart under a desk by the kitchen or a filing cabinet that complements your décor in the living room.

But every household needs a filing system. Every piece of paper worth keeping should have a permanent home where you will know to look for it.

2. Gather every piece of paper

Gather every piece of paper throughout the house. This group includes magazines, coupons, receipts, notebooks, journals, books, and gift cards.

This exercise might result in several bins of stuff you’ve never seen before. And that is okay! We’ll take one box and one category at a time.

3. Divide and conquer

Start with one box and sort its contents into the categories you find in that bin or container. Then, tackle the second bin of mixed contents and repeat the process.

As you move along, take your trash to the trash and clean the bins that you empty.

Pro Tip: Tackle each category separately. Do not start with a group while still working on another.

4. Sort bigger items

Start with the bigger stuff, such as books and magazines. Decide what can be donated, sold, trashed, or recycled.

Then, see where to allocate what you keep. For example, you might already have a logical space in your home for those items. In that case, merge your gathered items with corresponding objects in their designated home space.

Note that if you run out of space to place all items together, you can purge items by evaluating the entirety of your collection. If this does not give you the needed area, consider an alternative space for these items. The important thing is to keep the same type of items together.

5. On with the paper

Set up the following boxes to collect four types of paper:

  • Recycle

  • Shred (only for sensitive information)

  • File (all documents you decide to keep in paper format)

  • Digitize (paper to be digitized and let go of print)

Keep paper to digitize in a separate box and set aside as a project for the near future.

Every piece of paper needs a decision, and every piece you keep needs a permanent home in a file.

6. Create These Files

  • “Important Documents” File

Important and official documents such as birth certificates, social security cards, passports, and the like need their file, so you will always know where the most important things are.

  • “Medical” File

You will want to make a “Medical” folder for each household member. Here is where you file medical records, EOBs, insurance, etc. If you have too much paper in this category, you may need to have Medical-Records, Medical EOBs, Medical-Insurance, etc.

  • “Taxes” File

Decide what you might need to keep for tax purposes for the current year and place all that material in a file called “Current year taxes.”

When filing past years’ taxes, eliminate anything other than the IRS’s need if they audit you.

Discard any envelopes, especially manila envelopes, and unfold papers to letter size.

If you need to keep papers or receipts together, paperclip or binder clip them on the right side. That way, when they are in their folders, you can easily see what’s what.

Keep seven years’ tax history and shred the oldest each year.

Consider digitizing everything. Digitized documents are acceptable to the IRS. But always check with an accounting professional regarding financial/tax decisions.

  • “Owner’s Manuals & Warranties” File

It does not matter what these are; it needs a file to keep a user’s manual. Create a “Household Manuals” folder and place them all together. You can be more specific and divide the category (like tools, appliances, miscellaneous, etc.).

  • “Hold & Throw” File (or tray)

The Hold & Throw is a parking spot for things you may want shortly, but that will be irrelevant in a few months.

This space could be a tray or a file within your system. Some examples in this category are receipts for clothes, neighborhood trash schedules, and paid bills. These items are not worth filing long-term, and you can safely throw them away every couple of months. This practice negates piles of advertisements, receipts, brochures, and things people put on their refrigerators. If the paper will be irrelevant in a few months, it goes in the “Hold & Throw” folder.

  • “To Do” File (or tray)

Among the papers you find, decide what is “to do.” Place that in your “to-do” tray/file. Once done, let go of these papers. You might want to make a note on your schedule to ensure you tackle those “to-do” tasks promptly and consistently.

7. Sort other categories of paper

  • Coupons

Get a coupon wallet to keep in your kitchen drawer. All store coupons and gift cards can live there until needed. They will be accessible whenever you go shopping. Review this wallet monthly to let go of expired offers and coupons.

  • Loose pictures

Set pictures apart and place them with other images you might have. Photos deserve their category, and the procedures to handle picture organization are here.

  • Business cards

Transfer business cards (including those refrigerator magnets with business information) to your computer or mobile phone with card scanning apps or software available.

  • Receipts

You can find discarded receipts online by accessing your bank account or transaction history with the vendor.

If you need receipts to return or exchange something, those receipts should probably go into your “To Do” file or your “Hold & Throw” file.

Moving Forward with Mail

Mail comes into the home daily for most people. We would return to square one very soon without a system to handle mail effectively.

Handling mail daily doesn’t mean handling everything completely. Instead, it means opening each mail piece and directing it to where the action will occur. This should take one or two minutes of your day when you come home.

To this end, you should have your recycle bin and your “To Do” and “To File” files or trays in your mail processing area. Have a recycling bin next to the mail processing area so that all junk mail goes immediately to recycling. Then, sort the rest according to the action each piece will require in the future.

Recycle — Place all junk mail in your recycle bin immediately

To-Do — Things that will require some action (like paying a bill or RSVPing to an activity)

To File — Papers or documents that you’ll want to keep for reference and that belong to any of the file categories in your filing system

OHIO Rule (Only Handle It Once)

If you want to be one step ahead, apply the “OHIO Rule.” It means that you immediately deal with any paper coming into your home instead of setting it down, unopened, to deal with later.

In this case, you commit to processing each mail piece completely when you first handle it. Handling your mail this way reduces paper clutter and eliminates the need to deal with paper later.

Schedule It

Remember that if you follow the steps to handle mail every so often, you need to schedule in your calendar as a weekly or biweekly activity — time to finish processing the mail you pre-classified. The “one-touch rule” eliminates this second part of the process.

Tackling your paper might seem daunting. Nobody said you must finish organizing all your accumulated paper in a day. Paper is the thing that takes the longest to manage! Take your time and work on one category at a time. The space and relief you will feel afterward are worth every moment you invest in the project.

You can tame the paper monster. But, as with everything in life, keeping it under control requires commitment and effort.

If you need help organizing and deciding about your paper, contact us! We will be thrilled to nosedive into your paper mess. Truly!

Digital Clutter Is A Thing

Digital Clutter Is A Thing

Digital clutter is a thing. Although it is present in many ways, its lack of physical appearance allows us to ignore it. This type of clutter appears as a disorganized desktop, misplaced electronic files, multiple copies of the same documents, and misspelled file names, among other things.

Our digital clutter causes us to spend precious time looking for information, going through duplicated files and folders, forgetting tasks, and missing appointments. 

Digital clutter fills up your hard drive; before you know it, you also have 10,000+ messages in your inbox.

Organizing our email system might be a daunting task. However, email is so front and center in our lives that a change in this area can produce substantial changes to boost productivity and increase our efficiency.

Here are some email management tips to reduce electronic clutter, especially regarding emails.

Retail Bombarding

How about setting up a folder for promotions and store-related matters? If your email service does not allow creating folders within the inbox, consider setting up a separate email account just for stores, ads, and orders. After setting up that folder, go through your retail subscriptions and move each to the new folder. 

Instead, if you need to create a new email account, change the email address retailers use to communicate with you to the new account’s email address. Then, only check your new retail folder or the new email account when placing orders. Finally, clean out the new file or inbox monthly.

Email and Breakfast Do Not Match 

Avoid reading your email first thing in the morning. When you do, you let someone or something else prioritize your day. This practice sets the day off to a stressful tone—instead, schedule times during the day to read your email. You will notice increased productivity in your email response time and other tasks.

That Chime

For most, the chime of a new message creates an immediate reaction to checking the email. Turn off notification sounds that make you jump and see how productive you become. You lose momentum and efficiency when distracted by email notifications. And remember that the multitasking phenomenon is a myth. Attempting to multitask makes us absent-minded and derailed.

Update Contacts

Add important senders right to your address book. Otherwise, their messages might appear spam or junk, and you will miss important information and dates. Keep your contacts updated for your peace of mind.

Managing Emails Efficiently

Strive to read each email only once. Using folders and category options in the email is a necessity. Use the following categories or actions for each email message:

    • Delete – When the message is not needed now or later, delete it immediately.
    • 2-Minute Action – If your response or action to this message will take less than 2 minutes, process the information at that moment and then delete it. If the answer or action requires additional time, leave the message in the inbox as a reminder to tackle it later.
    • Pending Matter – Messages with information to be referred to in the short-term future and notifications to remember can stay in the inbox until the time comes to act on these. Limit inbox messages to follow-up and immediate action items to allow these messages to stand out.
    • File – File messages or notifications containing information for future reference. These messages might deserve a permanent electronic file, but removing them from the inbox is essential.

An inbox containing 4,230 messages will not help improve efficiency or boost productivity – it will hide essential messages that should stand out for your inbox to become a productivity tool.

More importantly, an inbox with this many messages is evidence of delayed decisions. An inbox full of messages of all kinds is no different than that basement or garage, where you keep things “just in case” – no one knows what is in there.

Digital clutter might not be as apparent as physical clutter, but it affects us. And whether the mess is digital or physical, it creeps up every time we postpone decisions and actions. 

So, decide and act promptly and consistently when processing your email messages. Decrease your digital clutter by increasing your inbox control.

P.S. If you dive into organizing your digital clutter, you want to expand your planning to include organizing pictures and organizing media.